Building To Destroy

Building To Destroy By Kirk Hunt

But he disdained to lay hands on Mordecai alone, for they had told him of the people of Mordecai. Instead, Haman sought to destroy all the Jews who were throughout the whole kingdom of Ahasuerus—the people of Mordecai.

Esther 3:6 NKJV

Based on an offense from one man, Haman sought to destroy an entire people. His reaction is retaliation on a massive, disproportionate scale. Vengeance is a blood-thirsty type of lust. Haman was not the first man or woman to seek vengeance. Unfortunately, he is clearly not the last.

Consider the men and women around you. There is a very good chance that someone you know personally is vindictive and unforgiving. Do not be fooled because their eyes do not glow red, nor do they froth at the mouth. Vengeful is as vengeful does.

Haman spent time, treasure and talent on trying to destroy Mordecai and the Jews. Haman could have focused on the duties of his office. Haman could have indulged in the privileges of his high rank. Instead he directed his mind to sinister and cruel thoughts.

Vengeance is not noble, strong or clever. Wise men and women seek righteous outcomes and avoid inflicting casualties, even on enemies. As a man or woman of God, avoid the all too human lust to inflict vengeance on those who offend you.

Haman could have sanctioned Mordecai alone. Instead, his lust for blood and dominance demanded no less than a gallows (Esther 5:14). Even now, I flinch at the overreaction.

Haman had rank and privilege, wealth and fame. Yet his lust for power and dominance ruled him. What rules you?

Think: Godly men and women flee thoughts of vengeance.

Pray: “Lord, guide my thoughts in paths worthy of You.”

Copyright © July 2017, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

Come To Save Them

Come To Save Them By Kirk Hunt

But He turned and rebuked them, and said, “You do not know what manner of spirit you are of. For the Son of Man did not come to destroy men’s lives but to save them.” And they went to another village.

Luke 9:55–56 NKJV

The Disciples were eager to use their power. They wanted to indulge their lust for control and dominance. Jesus reminded them He came to save lives.

I am distressed and saddened by the adversarial and vindictive words and actions of too many in our society. I am especially upset by those who claim to be God’s people. Even cursory examination of the Gospels reveals that Jesus is neither a brawler or spiteful.

He extended dignity, mercy and grace to adulterers, prostitutes and publicans. He was silent before Pilate. He did not call a host of angels to save Himself from the Cross. Jesus demonstrated, in the flesh, that the truly strong understand how to restrain their strength.

By having control over His strength, Jesus was able to fulfil His purpose to save mankind. He did not come to destroy men’s lives. Nor did He allow His disciples to flame strike the Samaritan village, despite their rudeness and inhospitality.

Do you have self-control? Do you understand Jesus’ purpose should be your purpose as well? God’s people are called to save men and women.

We save others by being careful how we use the power that God entrusts to us. Just because you can, does not mean you should. Remember; Jesus saves.

Think: As a disciple of Jesus, I am to save the lives of men and women, not destroy them.

Pray: “Lord, help me to save the lives of those around me.”

 

Copyright © July 2017, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

Spirit of Self-Control

Spirit of Self-Control By Kirk Hunt

But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control. Against such there is no law.

Galatians 5:22–23 NKJV

 

Self-control is the act of deciding if or when you engage in a particular behavior. I say if, then when, I will eat a cookie. Fasting, an exercise in self-control, is the deliberate restraint of consuming food. Media fasting is a different example of voluntary restraint.

 

Do you really want power in your own life? How about the ability to easily resist the plots and plans of others? Develop your self-control. “More salad, fewer cookies.”

 

The ability to control your own actions is the first step to purity. Joseph demonstrated self-control when he refused Potiphar’s wife. Daniel was immune to political attack because of his impeccable personal and public life. Jesus was worthy of the Cross because of His sinless life. Purity (via self-control) gave them power, influence and impact.

 

I am not suggesting that you move into a convent or monastery. If anything, I encourage you to engage with your city. Just do so with self-control. “More grace, less (no) condemnation.”

 

All things are lawful, but not all things are helpful.” If I want to look better in the mirror I must eat more salads and fewer cookies. Do I want to impact my city for Jesus? I must act with increasing grace and forbearance.

 

I can stride confidently and peacefully through work and home. All I have to do is live with more grace and no sin. The spirit of self-control lets me decide my next act.

Think: Self-control is the act of deciding my own behavior.

Pray: “Lord, help me to have the self-control You want me to have.”

 

Copyright © October 2016, Kirk Hunt

 

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.